Lyme disease

With described video

Transcript - Lyme disease

As Canadians spend more time outside during the warmer months, it's important to recognize that taking precautions to protect your health when outdoors involves more than just remembering the sunscreen.

(Three kayakers carry kayaks along a path through a wooded area.

A woman in a sun hat listens to music on her personal device outside.

A mother and daughter hike through a forest trail while walking a dog.

Sunscreen is applied to a toddler's back while he is drinking water.)

One potential hazard during the warmer months for Canadians is Lyme disease.

(A family cooking food on a barbecue by a campsite.)

Once thought to be a rare occurrence, Lyme disease is here in Canada.

(A research technician examines ticks in a petri dish in a laboratory setting.

Close-up shot of ticks crawling.)

It's a serious illness spread by the bite of infected blacklegged ticks that are most often found in forests and the overgrown areas between the woods and open spaces.

(An overgrown wooded area with lush green shrubs and bushes on the forest floor.)

Whether gardening, hiking or camping, you and your family can follow simple steps to prevent tick bites:

  • Wear closed-toe shoes and cover exposed skin.
  • Dress in light-coloured clothing.
  • Walk in the centre of trails and avoid tall vegetation.

(Close ups of a mother and daughter wearing closed-toe shoes and dressing in light-coloured clothing. A family walks down an outdoor path.)

  • Use an appropriate insect repellent, like DEET or Icaridin, on skin, clothing and gear.

(A mother applies insect repellant to a child.)

  • Check your clothing and skin for ticks after you've been outdoors. Don't forget to check your kids and pets too.

(A mother checks a child's clothing for ticks.)

  • And take a shower or bath within 2 hours of your return from the outdoors

(Close up of a woman's feet as she showers.)

For more prevention tips to protect yourself and your family, visit

(Government of Canada © Her Majesty, the Queen in Right of Canada as represented by the Public Health Agency of Canada, 2014)


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